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by old faithful
Sat Feb 21, 2009 3:46 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: What're you drinking right now?
Replies: 15861
Views: 1500619

Mill St. Barley Wine 2008. This is a superb interpretation of a strong English stock beer style, probably very close to the old October beers of the English countryside. It is very well-knit and while upwards of a year old shows no sign of wear (no signs of oxidation or excess acidity) but offers go...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 19, 2009 9:05 pm
Forum: Good Pub Reviews
Topic: Bow and Arrow - closed
Replies: 8
Views: 4704

I'm very sorry to hear this.

Gary
by old faithful
Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:10 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Thanks for that, Derek, I will check it out.

I had the good fortune recently to taste Dorothy Goodbody's stout on cask in New York at Gingerman in exemplary condition. Its taste was similar to the taste note from the mid-1800's porter writer I mentioned. Black Katt is pretty close too.

Gary
by old faithful
Sat Feb 14, 2009 4:25 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

From my reading, there is a distinction between ale sold for quick consumption, which would be little hopped; porter sold for ditto, which was ditto; and beers (ale, porter or other) stored to be served months hence or longer, which were more alcoholic, hoppier, and dryer due to periodic ferments in...
by old faithful
Fri Feb 13, 2009 1:29 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

My feelings are based on a lot of things. They are based for example on having read recently that porter in the 1800's should taste "pleasantly bitter" and slightly acid. I can understand what that means, there are many porters today that taste like that. Or that ale - at least not that ex...
by old faithful
Fri Feb 13, 2009 6:55 am
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Thanks for that information on Fuller's Chiswick Bitter. One and half pounds per barrel (I'll assume they use whole flowers) is about the average which I've read was typical starting from about 1900. It sounds similar to the low end of hopping for pale ales in the 1800's, and perhaps became the norm...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 8:18 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

All good points, but the old timers used both bittering and aroma hopping in the kettle (i.e., apart from dry-hopping). There are lots of statements that hops should not be long-boiled where it is desired to impart more the aroma of hops than their bitterness. This was done especially for ales. Just...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:47 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

6 pounds per barrel is what I've read is pretty near top-range for the best exported IPAs, close to what the Burton brewers would have used. I'll have to try Pliny The Elder. I've been to RR but drank his English-style bitter (which was great), and one of the sour oak-aged beers.

Gary
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:45 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Okay good 2.8 pounds, puts it in the zone definitely for some 1800's IPAs.

Gary
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:39 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Well, I understand. And a full body can stand more hops than a lean one, to be sure. But still... Look at this extract I just saw on the Fuller site in U.K.: "The four major ingredients of beer are water, malt, hops and yeast. An average daily brew of Fuller's flagship brand London Pride uses 7...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 1:41 pm
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

But still, can any commercial brewers here state approximately what is used - not pellets but normal bagged hops - per barrel (or 36 gallons) of finished beer, if not for their own beers, then as an industry yardstick? That would give some idea of the range in relation to pale ales in the 1800's (wh...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 11:59 am
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Okay then why not go to a simpler way and perhaps one more accurate. How many pounds of hops (I am referring to bagged dried hop flowers not pellets) are used per gallon to brew a pale ale today? Is it a half-pound, two, three? What is it I wonder for the Dogfish "minute" beers? And (back ...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:29 am
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

Okay thanks, that is helpful, so this would suggest around 100 IBUs per English barrel, which is quite astonishing. 1060 would be about right for many IPAs then (and now). Not sure how lupulin and the aa's have changed but I would discount this because we are going more (I'd suggest) for a general i...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 8:45 am
Forum: Random Talk
Topic: IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops
Replies: 27
Views: 5955

IBUs and Pounds per Barrel of Hops

In continuing my readings on historical beers, I've read that pale ales and IPAs in the 1800's used between 2-6 pounds hops per barrel, a barrel being 36 gallons. The lower end was for pale ales and "domestic" IPA, the higher end for beers intended for export to India or for long keeping. ...
by old faithful
Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:36 am
Forum: Beer Reviews
Topic: Mill St. Tripel
Replies: 25
Views: 5228

I just tried this at beerbistro. An excellent beer, with that strong Belgian yeasty note that does characterise certain tripels and also some golden ales (Duvel kept coming to mind, also Affligem). I don't get any connection to a gueuze style though. By the way, the English beer Speckled Hen has to ...

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