Brahma

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Steve Spong
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Postby Steve Spong » Wed Apr 19, 2006 1:35 pm

While the climate of Mexico and Latin America in general dictates a lot of quaffable, refreshing drinks, there are decent, different beers that are available in Mexico.

The last time I was there, I had a new beer that was surprisingly decent local attempt at a porter/stout called Potro. I believe it was brewed by Corona, but I can't swear by it. I still have a bottle (empty, unfortunately) because it was very unique - blue glass that was a square block with the neck sticking straight up.

There is also the Casta brewery, which I gather is still producing some great Belgian-style beers and other interesting stuff. Even by Canadian and American standards, it was expensive. When I can get a 6-pack of a local beer for four or five bucks, twelve or fourteen is pretty steep. I can't remember the individual beers, but I do remember liking them all very very much.

And of course, my favourite Mexican standby is Negra Modelo, which is not highly exceptional in the greater scheme of things, but still a great beer for quaffing on a beach, and still being able to get some flavour. It's also good on draught, but that's a rarity. If the LCBO got it in, I'd probably grab the odd six-pack sometime. The last time I had it was in Rochester last month (if you're in a Wegman's at 1:45 in the morning, there's not a lot of choice) and I enjoyed it.

Unfortunately, most of these beers have to be obtained locally - I think that there's something of a bias on the importation of Mexican beers into the States (forget about Ontario - we have a pipeline for our Eastern Euro beer).
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GregClow
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Postby GregClow » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:25 pm

Steve Spong wrote: Unfortunately, most of these beers have to be obtained locally - I think that there's something of a bias on the importation of Mexican beers into the States


You can get a lot of mainstream Mexican beers in Southern California, preumably due to the size of the Latino market. I assume it might be the same in parts of Texas and New Mexico, and possibly at Latino markets & bodegas in other cities.
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Postby old faithful » Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:55 pm

Well that taste competition sounds interesting, I'd like to participate in one of those, including beers of different styles.

I have found that locally produced commercial pilsener style beers can be pretty good in parts of Europe (e.g. in Luxembourg, Northern France, Spain, Portugal) and perhaps Latin America offers similar examples but (usually) lighter. E.g. in the Caribbean last Xmas I liked Presidente which seemed maltier and more tasty than the others I tried. I was comparing Brahma more to the lighter beers generally available in Canada and would rate it quite high that way. I like certain micro beers' lights too, e.g. Upper Canada Light and Sleeman Light are not bad at all but (and I know I can sound like a broken record on this) they must be sampled in optimum condition. That can make a huge difference to one's estimate of a beer (any beer). I think it is a challenge to any brewmaster to make a mild-tasting beer that is clean (i.e., no faults) but has a definable pleasant taste.


Gary
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Postby Josh Oakes » Sun Apr 23, 2006 12:19 pm

I've ranted about this creation before, might have been here even, but the beer isn't worth a second look.

Might I suggest that inventing possible uses for a beer when you know deep down you won't ever buy it again isn't really all that objective. Objective would be just to say "Hey, I didn't hate it. I think it's one of the best in its class. But I won't buy it again."

And Greg is right. This beer was created at Dommelsch in the Netherlands. It is brewed there for the European market. After a few months, they started making it in Brazil for the North American market.

Here's a thought. Even if this beer flops, they'll have used it to work out the logisitics of brewing in South America and getting to market in North America quickly. InBev is closing De Kluis. Soon our Hoegaarden will be Brazilian. North American brewery workers are almost as expensive as European ones. You watch - in ten years Blue will be Brazilian. Canadians have already demonstrated that we're stupid enough to pay $12 a six pack, or $6 a pint, for macrobrew, so it's not like importing the stuff is going to shatter any consumer price ceilings. If I'm running InBev, I'm crunching some serious numbers and looking for a way to get out of brewing in Canada entirely. This beer is a big step for them.
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Mississauga Matt
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Postby Mississauga Matt » Sun Apr 23, 2006 12:45 pm

Josh Oakes wrote:... If I'm running InBev, I'm crunching some serious numbers and looking for a way to get out of brewing in Canada entirely...


Except that Molson and Labatt's put a lot of effort into indoctrinating the country to believe that Canadian beer, theirs in particular, is quality stuff.

So if Molson's and Labatt's wants to sell a foreign made Ex or Blue to Canadians, they'll have to come up with a better lie than the Capilano Brewery, 'cause the average Joe "knows" that Canadian beer is better and will opt for Lakeport or some such thing (and it's cheaper too).
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SteelbackGuy
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Postby SteelbackGuy » Sun Apr 23, 2006 12:46 pm

And I for one, will not be buying any, save the 12 I bought a few weeks ago for trade purposes.

People come into the LCBO, and when they bring the following brands to my counter,they always ask me if I had tried it, because it is sooooo much better than corona:


Brahma
A Marca Bavaria
Sol

And Patagonia sells like gangbusters. Because it's "better than corona".


And when I suggest something else, like Fuller's, or Creemore, King, Etc, I get this.... "I don't like dark beer"


Anyway, this is my rant. We should all do what we can to ensure the failure of shit like this.


Len
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Postby Beer Geek » Mon Apr 24, 2006 7:35 am

I would have to agree with Mississauga Matt on this one. Think back 10 years ago when Labatt’s brought Kokanee from out west and started brewing it out of their London brewery, yet advertised that it was made with pure glacial water from the Rockies. Once Joe six pack realised they were being played, that beer took a dive. It was not until recently that they brought it back, and I believe it is truly made out west now (I still wouldn’t hold my breath that it’s made with pure glacial water from the rockies however).
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Postby esprit » Mon Apr 24, 2006 10:26 am

global warming...there are no glaciers!
old faithful
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Postby old faithful » Mon Apr 24, 2006 1:50 pm

Personally I pay little mind to ads. It does not matter to me where a beer is made. Since beer is made from stocked products like barley malt and hops which often are sourced from around the world, using (sometimes) brewmasters, plant or technology from distant lands (it was German traditions that got implanted mostly in Latin America), the local character of beer in many cases is something open to interpretation. The fact that a beer is brewed away from its original source as sold in a local market (e.g. Sapporo as sold in Ontario) is of no moment to me, its quality is all I care about. I believe Sam Adams Lager is brewed in various locations in the U.S. in recent years and that's fine. It's okay that Pilsener Urquel is made (some of it anyway) in Poland. Maybe one day Sam Adams will be brewed in Ontario under license, I wouldn't mind since it would be made closer to source. Each beer sold is in a certain category and is directed to a certain market. I will find a use for the remainder of the Brahma pack I bought (one made a nice black and tan last night with Wellington Imperial Stout 2:1), or one might be good on its own after a long bike ride. I probably won't buy it again for home use but if I am at a party or restaurant where the choice is limited I might choose it over other commercial beers because it has a pleasant taste. Maybe because my tastes were developed just before the micro and import eras started in earnest (or maybe because that is just my taste, in part) I never lost an interest in well-made commercial beers. I am not abashed to say so and there is merit - for some - in well-made beer that isn't too assertive in taste. For those who find it too bland or uninteresting that is their right of course and the market offers plenty of alternatives.

Gary
Last edited by old faithful on Mon Apr 24, 2006 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John Aitken
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Postby John Aitken » Mon Apr 24, 2006 2:08 pm

The guy on the Brahma advertising billboard on top of a building at Carlaw and Dundas looks like he is having so much fun drinking this that I think I will have to try it. :roll: :-?
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Belgian
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Postby Belgian » Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:23 pm

I buy whatever advertisements tell me to. So? :-?
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old faithful
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Postby old faithful » Fri Aug 18, 2006 5:09 pm

Today I was told by a person sampling the beer at an LCBO outlet that it is flavoured with papaya.

I had not known this.

As stated earlier above, I had found a pleasant fruity taste in the beer (I called it "citric"). Now I know why.

I just wish they'd ditch the clear bottle.

Gary
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GregClow
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Postby GregClow » Fri Aug 18, 2006 10:53 pm

old faithful wrote:Today I was told by a person sampling the beer at an LCBO outlet that it is flavoured with papaya.


They were wrong. InBev's promotional fluff for Brahma mentions that it has "a papaya after-note" in the flavour, but there is no actual papaya used in the brewing process.

old faithful wrote:I just wish they'd ditch the clear bottle.


Why would they do that? After all, the main reason Labatt/InBev released this beer in Canada was summed up by one of their big-wigs as follows:

"(Bramha) will fill a hole we have in our portfolio - the clear bottle - which represents a 4.1% share of the market in Canada."

Get with the program, Gary - if you're drinking the fizzy yellow corn-squeezin's from the big boys, then the package is more important than the product. :roll:
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Postby old faithful » Sat Aug 19, 2006 10:10 am

Thanks, Greg. Saying it has a note of papaya doesn't mean a flavouring wasn't added but you sound pretty sure so I'll accept that pending any further information which suggests anything different! A fruity taste is not typical of lagers (usually) but I was just reading in New World Guide To Beer that in warm countries, lager yeasts have evolved in some cases due to the climate and can produce such flavours, so I don't doubt the flavour derives apparently from natural fermentation.

As for the clear bottle - they can keep the clear bottle for marketing, okay, but why not put out a canned version?

Earlier this week I ordered a beer at a beer bar downtown and its best by-date was October 2005. It tasted lousy. Before that, I had a micro ale that was not off but had a weird, unbalanced taste. Day before that, I had a micro lager that tasted like borax was added (it was just off). I wish I had ordered two Brahmas instead. I could have ordered other micro beers, but I might have been as unlucky as for the ones I did choose. Then again, I might have had (as often I do) a great experience. The point about Brahma is it tastes nice (provided not light- struck) and would not expose me to these risks. As I have often said, even when (as is necessary) craft beer is consumed fresh, my experiences (and I only speak for me) have always been chancy (let alone with real ale in Canada but even in Britain, often). With well-made commercial beer that issue does not arise and that is an advantage that big brewers have which is not inconsiderable.

Gary
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pootz
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Postby pootz » Sun Aug 20, 2006 9:06 am

Steve Spong wrote:And of course, my favourite Mexican standby is Negra Modelo, which is not highly exceptional in the greater scheme of things, but still a great beer for quaffing on a beach, and still being able to get some flavour. It's also good on draught, but that's a rarity. If the LCBO got it in, I'd probably grab the odd six-pack sometime. The last time I had it was in Rochester last month (if you're in a Wegman's at 1:45 in the morning, there's not a lot of choice) and I enjoyed it.


Ahhhh a kindred spirit....we agee that the Negra Modelo is not great but the better of the lot :wink:
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