What're you brewing right now?

Post your own tasty recipes or homebrewing advice here.

Moderators: GregClow, Cass, grub

User avatar
markaberrant
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Regina, SK

Postby markaberrant » Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:58 pm

Derek wrote:I knew I was underpitching and I don't aerate, so I wanted to get it going. Ambient 20C for the first 33 hrs (started getting that juicy fruit aroma), then moved to the 15.5C for the remainder.


That's pretty much a perfect storm for a ton of esters.

I also underpitch and underaerate my hefes to get as much yeast character as possible, but like I say, pitch it cool. The hefe strains are so agressive, they can handle it.

I have also heard that pitching temp + fermenting temp = 30C thing for years too. I think it is a bunch of bull that people have simply reiterated as fact. I don't think it is mentioned in the Brewing With Wheat book.
User avatar
Derek
Beer Superstar
Posts: 3192
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2004 1:11 pm
Location: Kelowna, BC
Contact:

Postby Derek » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:24 pm

markaberrant wrote:
Derek wrote:I knew I was underpitching and I don't aerate, so I wanted to get it going. Ambient 20C for the first 33 hrs (started getting that juicy fruit aroma), then moved to the 15.5C for the remainder.


That's pretty much a perfect storm for a ton of esters.

I also underpitch and underaerate my hefes to get as much yeast character as possible, but like I say, pitch it cool. The hefe strains are so agressive, they can handle it.

I have also heard that pitching temp + fermenting temp = 30C thing for years too. I think it is a bunch of bull that people have simply reiterated as fact. I don't think it is mentioned in the Brewing With Wheat book.


And it was fairly high gravity too! :P

So far the clove aroma has been subtle all along. There was a hint of sulfur before kraussen, but nothing after that.

Before I moved it to the cellar I was starting to get that Juicy Fruit (tm) aroma, but today it's ALL banana. The whole room smells like banana. I actually had to go eat a banana to satisfy the craving that it instilled!

Eric Warner had that 30C thing in his German Wheat book... everyone does seem to take it as gospel. I hunted around for real brewery specs (particularly Weihenstephan), but all I found was the Schneider info in Brewing Wheat.

A lot of homebrewers seem to go for the 68-70F... but that may be more simplicity than experience.
JesseMcG
Posts: 398
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 8:51 pm

Postby JesseMcG » Tue Jun 14, 2011 10:20 am

Derek wrote:Mark suggested 15C a couple posts ago.

This is my first time brewing a hefe, but I think temperature depends on what you like. I love the fruity banana, but not much clove, so I'm doing it warmer. But I'm not sure how warm.

For the first 24 hrs it's been at 20C, which I think is good for yeast growth (I under-pitched with an 8 month old wyeast smack pack). Already starting to kraussen... not sure if I'll move it to the 18C basement tonight, or wait 'til morning.

Yeah, my temperature control is very primitive... variation in ambient temperature around the house (note: carboys sweat and mark wood floors). My last place had a roughed-in fireplace in the basement with no insulation, which was great in the winter. I don't typically brew in the summer.

Here's the wyeast info:

YEAST STRAIN: 3068 | Weihenstephan Weizen™

Back to Yeast Strain List

The classic and most popular German wheat beer strain used worldwide. This yeast strain produces a beautiful and delicate balance of banana esters and clove phenolics. The balance can be manipulated towards ester production through increasing the fermentation temperature, increasing the wort density, and decreasing the pitch rate. Over pitching can result in a near complete loss of banana character. Decreasing the ester level will allow a higher clove character to be perceived. Sulfur is commonly produced, but will dissipate with conditioning. This strain is very powdery and will remain in suspension for an extended amount of time following attenuation. This is true top cropping yeast and requires fermenter headspace of 33%.

Origin:
Flocculation: low
Attenuation: 73-77%
Temperature Range: 64-75° F (18-24° C)
Alcohol Tolerance: approximately 10% ABV


Hey Derek,

I just cracked my first couple of bottles of a hefe I brewed over a month ago. Only been in the bottle a week, but sat in primary for a month. I used the same yeast and fermented at approx 20 degrees, and I probably pitched slightly cooler. I do a partial boil (approx 3 gallons) and use an ice bath in the sink to cool. It works surprising well.

I was really worried I was going to have a banana bomb on my hands, but it didn't turn out that way at all. The banana is evident for sure, but is still relatively subtle and nice. The clove is even more subtle.

I went super simple with this one. I used two cans (6.6 lbs) of wheat extract from Briess, an ounce of Hallertau at 60 mins, and a year old smack pack that I popped 3 days in advance, that had just started to swell. The only aerating I did was shaking the shit out of the fermentation bucket. Fermentation took 48 hours to get really going.

Overall I'm pretty satisfied with how it turned out. I didn't take an OG reading, but the FG was 1.010. The only problem I have with it is that the aftertaste still gives the impression of "homebrew" to me. I believe it's the "extract twang" myth I've read so much about. It's not horrible, but there is just enough of it that I can pinpoint the beer as being something I made. Maybe the beer is just green? Having only been in the bottle for a week. We'll see.
codfishh
Posts: 113
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 12:54 pm
Location: Ottawa

Postby codfishh » Thu Jun 16, 2011 11:49 am

Brewed my 2nd ever batch on the weekend I was trying for a DFH Indian brown clone

This is the recipe I was trying for

10oz British amber malt
10oz Crystal 60L
8oz Chocolate malt
2oz roasted barley
Steep all of this at 150F for 30 minutes

Add 7lb Light DME
8oz Dark Brown sugar

1/2oz Warrior Hops for 60 Minutes
1oz Vanguard Hops at Flameout

Ringwood Ale Yeast/Wyeast 1187

I skipped the 10oz of British amber and 10oz crystal 60 and moved to 1lb of Crystal 80 on a recommendation that the British amber wouldn't steep well.

I also subbed the warrior hops for Chinook as I had no warrior and used Hallertau in place of vanguard.

I smacked the ringwood about 8 or 9 hours prior to pitch and it didn't swell very much. Aerated the wort by shaking the hell out of the carboy, waited 72hours and the stuff was still really dead.

I grabbed a new pack of yeast unfortunately I could only get the 1028 Wyeast London Ale, smacked it and let it sit for about 12 hours it swelled really tight. Pitched it and within 6 hours the fermentation was moving along.

I checked today and there's probably a 6 inch krausen on top of the wort.
It may not be an indian brown clone anymore but the wort was still tasty.

It had an OG of 1.080 I think the target for the recipe was 1.077, it's supposed to get down to 1.018 or so.
User avatar
markaberrant
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Regina, SK

Postby markaberrant » Thu Jun 16, 2011 5:24 pm

codfishh wrote:Brewed my 2nd ever batch on the weekend

Ringwood Ale Yeast/Wyeast 1187

I smacked the ringwood about 8 or 9 hours prior to pitch and it didn't swell very much. Aerated the wort by shaking the hell out of the carboy, waited 72hours and the stuff was still really dead.

I grabbed a new pack of yeast unfortunately I could only get the 1028 Wyeast London Ale, smacked it and let it sit for about 12 hours it swelled really tight. Pitched it and within 6 hours the fermentation was moving along.

I checked today and there's probably a 6 inch krausen on top of the wort.

It had an OG of 1.080 I think the target for the recipe was 1.077, it's supposed to get down to 1.018 or so.


Congrats on joining the hobby! Keep on keeping on!!!

Next time you make a high gravity beer, make a low gravity beer first, then repitch 1-2 cups of fresh slurry. Pitching lots of healthy yeast is absolutely critical to making clean beer, especially high gravity beers.
User avatar
Bonesey
Posts: 70
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:40 pm
Location: Toronto

Postby Bonesey » Fri Jun 17, 2011 6:59 am

Brewing a Saison in a few weeks and I'm on the fence about a starter. I really want decent ester production. Using Wyeast 3711, 6 gal batch, OG 1058. There doesn't seem to be a clear answer regarding intentionally underpitching and ester production on the internets. Mark, perhaps you could chime in? Thanks!
"Put another brick in my hookah, Chow Ming, and fetch me fresh silks, I've soiled myself again."
--Franklin Pierce, April 6, 1856
User avatar
grub
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1403
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:16 pm
Location: Biergötter Homebrew Club, Brantford
Contact:

Postby grub » Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:16 am

i don't think there's as much question when it comes to saisons. they're at their best when you treat them exactly how you've learned NOT to treat other yeast strains. most notably on temperature. that strain indicates that it's good into the high 70s, but the belgian strain (my personal favourite, despite its temperamental nature) is good up to 95F!
elproducto
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 10:11 am

Postby elproducto » Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:48 am

Bonesey wrote:Brewing a Saison in a few weeks and I'm on the fence about a starter. I really want decent ester production. Using Wyeast 3711, 6 gal batch, OG 1058. There doesn't seem to be a clear answer regarding intentionally underpitching and ester production on the internets. Mark, perhaps you could chime in? Thanks!


Watch your starting gravity on that one. My Saison with 3711 was 1.052 and finished at 1.001. Not what I was looking for ABV wise.
User avatar
markaberrant
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Regina, SK

Postby markaberrant » Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:55 am

elproducto wrote:Watch your starting gravity on that one. My Saison with 3711 was 1.052 and finished at 1.001. Not what I was looking for ABV wise.


3711 is highly attenuative and does not require high fermentation temps, low mash tamps or simple sugars to do so. These are my experiences with 3711:

1.053 - 1.006 89% attenuation
1.091 - 1.009 90% (this one did have a kg of demerara)
1.041 - 1.005 88%
1.063 - 1.003 95%
1.042 - 1.007 83%
1.070 - 1.007 90%
Last edited by markaberrant on Fri Jun 17, 2011 9:01 am, edited 3 times in total.
User avatar
markaberrant
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Regina, SK

Postby markaberrant » Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:56 am

Bonesey wrote:Brewing a Saison in a few weeks and I'm on the fence about a starter. I really want decent ester production. Using Wyeast 3711, 6 gal batch, OG 1058. There doesn't seem to be a clear answer regarding intentionally underpitching and ester production on the internets. Mark, perhaps you could chime in? Thanks!


I wouldn't bother with a starter if it is fresh. Pitch around 18C and then let it go!
elproducto
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 10:11 am

Postby elproducto » Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am

Wy 2565 Starter is firing away for my Kolsch to be brewed tomorrow.
cannondale
Bar Fly
Posts: 722
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:58 pm
Location: Barrie, Ontario, Canada

Postby cannondale » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:50 am

dutchcanuck wrote:I'm thinking of brewing my first hefe-wiezen in the coming weeks...just need to get my hands on some wheat malt. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on your own brew.


After about a month in the primary fermenter, I kegged it last week. Half went straight on the gas to force carb, the other half is naturally carbonating in a keg. This is easily the best hefeweizen that I've made so far. Cloudy amber, balance of banana and clove, very refreshing. Reminds me of weihenstephaner, which isn't surprising as the WY3068 is more or less the yeast strain they use. I really think the addition of a small amount of aromatic or melanoidin malt is of great benefit. Someone on here mentioned several months ago that they often or always do (markaberant?), and they are spot on. A little certainly goes a long way in a hefe though.
Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.
User avatar
markaberrant
Seasoned Drinker
Posts: 1664
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Regina, SK

Postby markaberrant » Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:55 pm

Yeah, a shot of melanoidin is a good idea in a hefe (sorry, can't remember if I suggested it originally or not).
User avatar
Derek
Beer Superstar
Posts: 3192
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2004 1:11 pm
Location: Kelowna, BC
Contact:

Postby Derek » Mon Jul 11, 2011 11:02 pm

Hefe's...

I really like the banana in the first one I did (underpitched, fairly high gravity, fairly warm). Thanks to Telus, my 2 hr mash resulted in a highly attenuated brew... It came in at 7%! One half I watered down to 5.5% and the other half I dry-hopped with home-grown cascades & watered down to 6%. So I've got over 7 Gallons of hefe for the summer. :D

I pitched a Weizenbock on that cake, including the remaining kraussen on top (over-pitched?), then fermented at 64F ambient temp. I find the banana a little too subtle and the cloves are a bit too strong for my delicate taste, though they're not overwhelming like some. Uncarbonated, it's pretty tasty (50% wheat, 32% Munich, 6% caramunich, 6% crystal 60, 6% melanoidin, double decoction).
User avatar
Derek
Beer Superstar
Posts: 3192
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2004 1:11 pm
Location: Kelowna, BC
Contact:

Postby Derek » Fri Jul 15, 2011 10:27 pm

Now that the first hefe is carbed, I'm getting more vanilla than anything. The banana is light and the cloves are very subtle.

Return to “Homebrewing Recipes and Tips”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron